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The independents have no such clout, mean- ing that cost recovery is far from certain. In 1991, the year after the first superstores emerged, independents accounted for 32.5 percent of book sales. Schoenfeld '84; Susan Tifft 73; Jane Vessels 77; Robert J. The chains have a hold on publishers that allows them to insist on favorable financial arrange- ments. Or customers can check electronically whether the book they want is on hand, have it reserved for them, and depart the virtual world for a visit to the physical store. The website offers a search- able database of every book in print, reviews, secure credit- card ordering, and shipping.will make you jf these I believe repared '—'iottftsjm Mmkanmi ' than I v**«fittl taytcvn le the ii the ams had a r Cn U 5tionship m f eloped 01 h M ° o 'not,ie and thei jthartjstic c re gjonal H selrbou . '88 ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Sam Hull FEATURES EDITOR: Kim Koster SCIENCE EDITOR: Dennis Meredith PUBLISHER: M. And entrepreneurs respond by generating a "boutique movement," whereby specialty sup- pliers steal market share from traditional mass merchandisers.

Since the early 1990s, the independents have experienced a steady loss of market share; reports of the closing of independents across the country have become com- monplace. Between 19, the independents' market share dipped from 24-9 per- cent to 17 percent. Noble superstore opened just between Durham and Chapel Hill. '83, Department of Health Administration; Pamela Orth Peters J. According to the American Booksellers Asso- ciation, by the beginning of August, the initiative had drawn in 1,000 members. Perhaps a bit para- doxically, independent stores across the country are grouping together into "Book Sense." Book Sense's biggest project, launched this fall, allows independents to offer sophisticated Internet ordering and fulfillment services. "It will of course feature our own readings schedule, staff favorites, and bestsellers. Book Sense is friendlier than the corporate sites, Campbell writes in a newsletter for his customers.

Since the early 1990s, the independents have experienced a steady loss of market share; reports of the closing of independents across the country have become com- monplace. Between 19, the independents' market share dipped from 24-9 per- cent to 17 percent. Noble superstore opened just between Durham and Chapel Hill. '83, Department of Health Administration; Pamela Orth Peters J. According to the American Booksellers Asso- ciation, by the beginning of August, the initiative had drawn in 1,000 members. Perhaps a bit para- doxically, independent stores across the country are grouping together into "Book Sense." Book Sense's biggest project, launched this fall, allows independents to offer sophisticated Internet ordering and fulfillment services. "It will of course feature our own readings schedule, staff favorites, and bestsellers. Book Sense is friendlier than the corporate sites, Campbell writes in a newsletter for his customers. '83, School of Medicine: Elizabeth Whitmore Kelley B. This fall's authors have ranged from Fred Chappell '61, A. '64, whose Look Back All the Green Valley com- pletes a series about a Southern family, to Erik Larson, with his best-selling Isaac's Storm, an account of America's deadliest hurricane. Now, that in and of itself does not necessarily mean that those folks are reading books.