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27-Jan-2020 09:17

A very few Gallery Specials were believed to have been made in black and chrome. The Black Diamond, Mohawk Brown, Seneca Green, Gallery Special and Apache Black variations are factory terms and are not found on the rifles though they were indicated on the box.Nylon 66s in the author’s collection include a Bicentenial (just below the boxed 66), Seneca Green just below it.A detachable magazine aka clip fed semi-auto called the Nylon 77 was made from 1970-1972.It had a 5 shot magazine though a 10 shot version was available in later production. Apparently Remington thought it better to rename the rifle than try to re-market it with the 10 shot clip.2006 amps have a small metal “Fender 60th Anniversary” button on the back plate. Early Tweeds The early green board tweed-covered amps were not lacquered. It has the same cream board inside with the same components as every other current-production Blues Junior.The serial numbers for these amps begin with “LO,” indicating that they were made in the Fender/Sunn Lake Oswego factory. It usually applies to old vacuum tubes/valves that have gone unsold for decades. All cream board tweed Blues Juniors have a “Limited Edition” plaque on the back.It’s a little weak in the bass and the highs are a bit more muted than the other speakers.(revised 2015) Production of the Nylon 66 started in 1959 and ran until 1989. The standard model had a brown stock (called Mohawk Brown) with blue metal. Variations included a green stocked version (Seneca Green), a black stock and chrome receiver version called “Apache black” and a black stock rifle with a blued receiver cover called the “Black Diamond”.

The bolts and the lever action are marked “Nylon” and the model number on the grip cap.

In addition, there was a “150th Anniversary” model produced in 1966 and a “Bicentennial” model in 1976.

Both had brown stocks and gold etched, blued receivers.

This speaker has been used in the Hot Rod Deluxe, Blues Deluxe, Deluxe Reverb and the Twin Reverb, among others. It doesn’t have the deepest bass, however, and the highs can sometimes be “fizzy.” When the cream board tweeds were introduced, Fender chose the Jensen reissue (made in Italy) C12N.

The C12N doesn’t sound much like vintage Jensens, and it can be shrill-sounding. Some people prefer the Special Design and don’t consider it an improvement.

The bolts and the lever action are marked “Nylon” and the model number on the grip cap.

In addition, there was a “150th Anniversary” model produced in 1966 and a “Bicentennial” model in 1976.

Both had brown stocks and gold etched, blued receivers.

This speaker has been used in the Hot Rod Deluxe, Blues Deluxe, Deluxe Reverb and the Twin Reverb, among others. It doesn’t have the deepest bass, however, and the highs can sometimes be “fizzy.” When the cream board tweeds were introduced, Fender chose the Jensen reissue (made in Italy) C12N.

The C12N doesn’t sound much like vintage Jensens, and it can be shrill-sounding. Some people prefer the Special Design and don’t consider it an improvement.

The NOS Blues Junior is a current production, lacquered tweed amp with a Jensen reissue C12N speaker. There’s nothing limited about the edition; they built a bunch and when they ran out, they built another bunch.