Single parents dating in calgary

22-Mar-2020 19:23

Karen George of Mays Landing, New Jersey, often swaps babysitting duties with a neighbor.

"When my husband and I first separated, my son was 15 months old, and there were times when I just needed to get out of the house for an hour," she recalls.

And it's fine to have a less-than-spotless house if it gives you more time with your kids.

"Before my son was born, I was a total neat freak," recalls Christina Mc Carthy of Hoffman Estates, Illinois."But after the baby arrived, I realized I was driving myself crazy trying to be a mom, work full-time, and keep everything perfect at home." These days, Mc Carthy has freed up some personal time by hiring cleaning help, but mostly she's learning to let things slide.

"I realized early on that no matter how strong I felt, I couldn't do this alone," she says.

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But single mothers need to be realistic about what they can -- and can't -- accomplish in a day, she adds."There are days when it's hard to feel as if I'm being the best mother," she admits."But then my best friend or another parent will remind me to hang in there or tell me she's proud of all I've done for my kids, and the morale boost helps to keep me going."For Tracy Shaw of Southbury, Connecticut, life wouldn't be the same without her Wednesday night supper club (she and three other families from her daughter's daycare center take turns cooking meals), a reasonably priced handyman, a support group called Parents Without Partners, a circle of friends, and reliable babysitters.(As single mom Leane Vinogradov, of Calgary, Alberta, aptly puts it: "I've often been to the point of tears and filled with guilt before I could pick up the phone.") But if you crave an hour or two alone so you can nap or take a break from the kids, need help around the house, or are coping with a family problem, don't be afraid to ask for help -- and be specific about what you need, says Jane Mattes, a New York City psychotherapist and founder of Single Mothers by Choice."There may be people in your life who want to help you but are not sure what to do."If -- like many single moms -- you feel uncomfortable asking for help, or worry that you're being a burden to busy family and friends, try to trade services with other parents.

But single mothers need to be realistic about what they can -- and can't -- accomplish in a day, she adds."There are days when it's hard to feel as if I'm being the best mother," she admits."But then my best friend or another parent will remind me to hang in there or tell me she's proud of all I've done for my kids, and the morale boost helps to keep me going."For Tracy Shaw of Southbury, Connecticut, life wouldn't be the same without her Wednesday night supper club (she and three other families from her daughter's daycare center take turns cooking meals), a reasonably priced handyman, a support group called Parents Without Partners, a circle of friends, and reliable babysitters.(As single mom Leane Vinogradov, of Calgary, Alberta, aptly puts it: "I've often been to the point of tears and filled with guilt before I could pick up the phone.") But if you crave an hour or two alone so you can nap or take a break from the kids, need help around the house, or are coping with a family problem, don't be afraid to ask for help -- and be specific about what you need, says Jane Mattes, a New York City psychotherapist and founder of Single Mothers by Choice."There may be people in your life who want to help you but are not sure what to do."If -- like many single moms -- you feel uncomfortable asking for help, or worry that you're being a burden to busy family and friends, try to trade services with other parents."I often feel guilty about a lot of things -- that my daughter's father isn't involved in her life, that I don't have the option to work at home, and that I don't always have the money or time to take her to Mommy and Me classes," she says.