Psychological effects of dating abuse

28-Jan-2020 04:24

Researchers analyzed a nationally representative sample of more than 5,000 U. adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 to determine whether or not they were engaging in healthy romantic relationships.

About 20 percent of respondents of both genders said they had experienced some type of psychological violence within a dating relationship, and ten percent of girls and eight percent of boys cited both psychological and physical violence.

But the issue doesn’t seem to be a current priority for legislators in Washington.

And the consequences of teen dating violence appeared to impact young women and men slightly differently.

Twenty five percent of boys and girls in high school said if your partner cheated on you, you should be allowed to hit him/her, and if your partner makes you jealous you should also be able to hit him/her.

Abusive Dating Partner Warning Signs Here are some early warning signs that a dating partner may have violent and abusive tendencies: • Extreme jealousy • Controlling and demanding • Manipulative and deceitful behavior • Quick to fall in love • Unpredictable mood swings • Use of alcohol and/or drugs • Violent and aggressive tendencies • Isolates victim from friends and family • Uses physical force during arguments • Requires constant contact, does not give space • Calls names and continuously puts others down • Comes from a family history of violence or criminal behavior • Dating Violence Victim Warning Signs: • Physical signs of injury • Decline in school performance • Decline in hygiene and appearance • Indecisive • Changes in mood or personality • Use of drugs/alcohol • Isolation • Depression • Decrease in self-esteem • Withdrawn from family and friends • Withdrawn from activities once enjoyed doing • • Overly dependent on boyfriend/girlfriend • Pregnancy • Has unexplainable injuries Helping your teen...

A new study in the Pediatrics journal finds that an estimated 30 percent of U. adolescents are the victims of an “aggressive heterosexual dating relationship,” a particularly troubling statistic given the significant public health risks that can result from intimate partner violence in teenage relationships.

The authors of the study note that their work represents one more addition to a growing body of research that suggests teen dating violence “is a substantial public health problem” in the United States.

And the consequences of teen dating violence appeared to impact young women and men slightly differently.Twenty five percent of boys and girls in high school said if your partner cheated on you, you should be allowed to hit him/her, and if your partner makes you jealous you should also be able to hit him/her.Abusive Dating Partner Warning Signs Here are some early warning signs that a dating partner may have violent and abusive tendencies: • Extreme jealousy • Controlling and demanding • Manipulative and deceitful behavior • Quick to fall in love • Unpredictable mood swings • Use of alcohol and/or drugs • Violent and aggressive tendencies • Isolates victim from friends and family • Uses physical force during arguments • Requires constant contact, does not give space • Calls names and continuously puts others down • Comes from a family history of violence or criminal behavior • Dating Violence Victim Warning Signs: • Physical signs of injury • Decline in school performance • Decline in hygiene and appearance • Indecisive • Changes in mood or personality • Use of drugs/alcohol • Isolation • Depression • Decrease in self-esteem • Withdrawn from family and friends • Withdrawn from activities once enjoyed doing • • Overly dependent on boyfriend/girlfriend • Pregnancy • Has unexplainable injuries Helping your teen...A new study in the Pediatrics journal finds that an estimated 30 percent of U. adolescents are the victims of an “aggressive heterosexual dating relationship,” a particularly troubling statistic given the significant public health risks that can result from intimate partner violence in teenage relationships.The authors of the study note that their work represents one more addition to a growing body of research that suggests teen dating violence “is a substantial public health problem” in the United States.The teen girls who were victimized by a boyfriend were more likely to engage in risky behaviors like smoking and heavy drinking five years down the line, and they also had an increased chance of experiencing symptoms of depression and thoughts of suicide.