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Ugarit and Phoenicia were closer neighbors of ancient Israel, and shared a topography and climate similar to that of ancient Israel.Thus, conclusions about the food and drink in ancient Israel have been made with some confidence from this evidence.During the Chalcolithic period (4300 – 3300 BCE), large pottery containers indicative of settled peoples, appear in the archaeological record.Date palm cultivation began in the Jordan River Valley, and the earliest date pits have been discovered at Ein Gedi by the Dead Sea.The Bible provides names of plants and animals that were used for food, such as the lists of permitted and forbidden animals (for example, Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14), and the lists of foods brought to the king’s table (for example, 1 Kings 5:2-3) or the foods that the Israelites are said to have longed for after leaving Egypt (Numbers 11:5).These lists indicate the potential foods that were available, but not necessarily how regularly the food was eaten or how significant it was in the cuisine, which needs to be derived from other sources.Archaeologists have found the carbonized seeds of two kinds of primitive wheat, einkorn and emmer, and two-rowed barley, in the earliest levels of digs at Jericho, one of the first cities in the world.

and grapes and olives became important crops in the hill country.

Significant milestones in the availability and development food production characteristic of Israelite cuisine occurred well before the Israelite period.

On the other hand, vestiges of the cuisine and the practices associated with it continue to resonate in later Jewish cuisine and traditions that developed in Israel and Babylonia during the Talmudic period (200 CE – 500 CE), and may still be discerned in the various culinary styles that have developed among Jewish communities since then.

Archaeological remains include the items used for the production of food, such as wine or olive presses; stone and metal implements used in the preparation of food; and amphorae, jars, storerooms and grain pits used for storage.

Animal bones provide evidence of meat consumption, the types of animals eaten, and whether they were kept for milk production or other uses, while paleobotanical remains, such as seeds or other carbonized or desiccated plant remains provide information about plant foods.

and grapes and olives became important crops in the hill country.

Significant milestones in the availability and development food production characteristic of Israelite cuisine occurred well before the Israelite period.

On the other hand, vestiges of the cuisine and the practices associated with it continue to resonate in later Jewish cuisine and traditions that developed in Israel and Babylonia during the Talmudic period (200 CE – 500 CE), and may still be discerned in the various culinary styles that have developed among Jewish communities since then.

Archaeological remains include the items used for the production of food, such as wine or olive presses; stone and metal implements used in the preparation of food; and amphorae, jars, storerooms and grain pits used for storage.

Animal bones provide evidence of meat consumption, the types of animals eaten, and whether they were kept for milk production or other uses, while paleobotanical remains, such as seeds or other carbonized or desiccated plant remains provide information about plant foods.

Ancient Israelite cuisine refers to the food eaten by the ancient Israelites during a period of over a thousand years, from the beginning of the Israelite presence in the Land of Israel at the beginning of the Iron Age until the Roman period.