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Two of those have been reopened as modified medical facilities, but no longer function as full-fledged hospitals.And more than half of the state’s remaining rural hospitals are vulnerable to closure, according to a 2016 report on rural hospital strength by i Vantage Health Analytics for the National Rural Health Association.“You don’t know what’s going to happen in the next five months,” Candler County Commission Chairman Glyn Thrift said last month. We have enough money to make payroll today.” A series of bad decisions ― especially the installation of a faulty IT system ― combined with the usual factors squeezing rural hospitals have left the Candler County Hospital with about million in accounts payable and an additional million debt that the county incurred on its behalf, according to hospital CEO Dave Flanders.The facility, located in the town of Metter, owes another

Two of those have been reopened as modified medical facilities, but no longer function as full-fledged hospitals.And more than half of the state’s remaining rural hospitals are vulnerable to closure, according to a 2016 report on rural hospital strength by i Vantage Health Analytics for the National Rural Health Association.“You don’t know what’s going to happen in the next five months,” Candler County Commission Chairman Glyn Thrift said last month. We have enough money to make payroll today.” A series of bad decisions ― especially the installation of a faulty IT system ― combined with the usual factors squeezing rural hospitals have left the Candler County Hospital with about $6 million in accounts payable and an additional $4 million debt that the county incurred on its behalf, according to hospital CEO Dave Flanders.The facility, located in the town of Metter, owes another $1.8 million in additional notes and liabilities.“There’s a psychological impact where people are tied to their hospital and feel comfort with it here,’’ said Doug Eaves, the Candler County administrator. It’s something they’ve always had.” “I understand things are changing, but try to have a thriving community without a hospital,” said Carvy Snell, publisher of the Metter Advertiser, a 104-year-old local paper.Metter’s main street is already showing economic cracks.“Now that may not seem like a lot, but it sure meant something to those folks’ families,” she said.

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Two of those have been reopened as modified medical facilities, but no longer function as full-fledged hospitals.

And more than half of the state’s remaining rural hospitals are vulnerable to closure, according to a 2016 report on rural hospital strength by i Vantage Health Analytics for the National Rural Health Association.

“You don’t know what’s going to happen in the next five months,” Candler County Commission Chairman Glyn Thrift said last month. We have enough money to make payroll today.” A series of bad decisions ― especially the installation of a faulty IT system ― combined with the usual factors squeezing rural hospitals have left the Candler County Hospital with about $6 million in accounts payable and an additional $4 million debt that the county incurred on its behalf, according to hospital CEO Dave Flanders.

The facility, located in the town of Metter, owes another $1.8 million in additional notes and liabilities.

.8 million in additional notes and liabilities.“There’s a psychological impact where people are tied to their hospital and feel comfort with it here,’’ said Doug Eaves, the Candler County administrator. It’s something they’ve always had.” “I understand things are changing, but try to have a thriving community without a hospital,” said Carvy Snell, publisher of the Metter Advertiser, a 104-year-old local paper.Metter’s main street is already showing economic cracks.“Now that may not seem like a lot, but it sure meant something to those folks’ families,” she said.

As many as 700 more are at risk of closing within the next 10 years, according to Alan Morgan, the CEO of the National Rural Health Association, a nonprofit professional organization that lobbies on rural health issues. You’ve got higher levels of obesity, diabetes, hypertension ― you pick up any health disparity or measure and it’s there,” Morgan said.

GLENWOOD ― If you want to watch a rural community die, kill its hospital.

After the Lower Oconee Community Hospital shut down in June 2014, other mainstays of the community followed.

Agriculture was once the primary employer, yet the Wheeler Correctional Facility, a privately run prison, is now the biggest source of jobs. “It’s been devastating,” the 72-year-old mayor said, leaning on one of the counters in Glenwood’s one-room city hall.

With 39 percent of the central Georgia county’s population living in poverty, there aren’t enough patients with good insurance to keep a hospital from losing money. “I tell folks that move here, ‘This is a beautiful place to live, but you better have brought money, because you can’t make any here.’ ” Rural hospitals are in danger across the country, their closures both a symptom of economic trouble in small-town America and a catalyst for further decline.

As many as 700 more are at risk of closing within the next 10 years, according to Alan Morgan, the CEO of the National Rural Health Association, a nonprofit professional organization that lobbies on rural health issues. You’ve got higher levels of obesity, diabetes, hypertension ― you pick up any health disparity or measure and it’s there,” Morgan said.GLENWOOD ― If you want to watch a rural community die, kill its hospital.After the Lower Oconee Community Hospital shut down in June 2014, other mainstays of the community followed.Agriculture was once the primary employer, yet the Wheeler Correctional Facility, a privately run prison, is now the biggest source of jobs. “It’s been devastating,” the 72-year-old mayor said, leaning on one of the counters in Glenwood’s one-room city hall.With 39 percent of the central Georgia county’s population living in poverty, there aren’t enough patients with good insurance to keep a hospital from losing money. “I tell folks that move here, ‘This is a beautiful place to live, but you better have brought money, because you can’t make any here.’ ” Rural hospitals are in danger across the country, their closures both a symptom of economic trouble in small-town America and a catalyst for further decline.The hospital has been unable to make debt payments to the county, forcing the local government to increase property taxes and borrow money in January and February to cover its own bills. We’ll probably rely on support from the county,” Hadden said.