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05-Aug-2020 05:28

The worldwide team of 31 senior scientists and clinicians, which include specialists from Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh and Manchester Universities and Imperial College, have written an editorial which suggests that microbes are the major cause of dementia.

Currently most scientists are trying to find treatments which prevent the build of sticky amyloid plaques and misfolded tau proteins in the brain which prevent neurons from communicating with each other, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline.

But with vitamin D in the bloodstream, T-cells begin seeking out invaders, which are then destroyed and carried out of the body.

You may recall the Japanese study we told you about in June which found that vitamin D was more effective than a vaccine in preventing flu, including pandemic flu.

We would like to reassure people that there remains no convincing evidence that Alzheimer’s disease is contagious or can be passed from person to person like a virus.

By contrast, antiviral drugs such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) reduced rates of infection by only 8 percent.Research from the University of Copenhagen shows that vitamin D activates the immune system by arming T-cells to fight off infections.Without vitamin D, the immune system’s T-cells remain dormant, offering little or no protection against invading microorganisms and viruses.There had been no convincing proof of infections causing Alzheimer disease.We need always to keep an open mind but this editorial does not reflect what most researchers think about Alzheimer disease.” Dr Simon Ridley, Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “There is growing evidence for the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s and active ongoing research looking at how an inflammatory response might contribute to the disease.

By contrast, antiviral drugs such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza) reduced rates of infection by only 8 percent.

Research from the University of Copenhagen shows that vitamin D activates the immune system by arming T-cells to fight off infections.

Without vitamin D, the immune system’s T-cells remain dormant, offering little or no protection against invading microorganisms and viruses.

There had been no convincing proof of infections causing Alzheimer disease.

We need always to keep an open mind but this editorial does not reflect what most researchers think about Alzheimer disease.” Dr Simon Ridley, Director of Research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “There is growing evidence for the role of the immune system in Alzheimer’s and active ongoing research looking at how an inflammatory response might contribute to the disease.

Professor Resia Pretorius of the University of Pretoria, who worked with Prof Kell on the editorial, said “The microbial presence in blood may also play a fundamental role as causative agent of systemic inflammation, which is a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.