Egyptian dating and marriage customs

21-Jan-2020 17:48

Since girls usually married at a young age it is likely that they were very much influenced by their parents wishes.

While we really do not know what the law had to say in the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms when a girl and her parents disagreed on her choice of mate, the situation became abundantly clear in the reign of Amasis, in the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty.

The Marriage Stele of Ramses II says, Then his Majesty saw that she was beautiful of face and like a goddess.

It was a great mysterious, wonderful and fortunate affair.

Love poems attest to very strong feelings of affection and attraction in couples that appear to be unmarried.

We have no way of knowing how many fell in love first and married second or how many married first, but it would seem that the ideal, at least in the literature, was that romantic love came first.

Most men were married by the age of twenty to girls who might have been as young as fifteen.

There was an age difference, but usually not more than two or three years.

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They gave in out of a sense of civic responsibility and a desire to produce a legal and socially acceptable heir.

It would appear that a woman was considered to have married if she took her belongings from her parents house and moved them and herself into the home of a man who was not already married to someone else.

There are records of parents using the occasion to transfer property to the bride or the groom but there are no other signs of anything approaching a ceremony or a party.

One of the more curious mysteries in that civilization is the complete absence of information on the act of getting married.

Legal papyri always identified a woman as the wife of and there are many documents attesting to a couples divorce.

They gave in out of a sense of civic responsibility and a desire to produce a legal and socially acceptable heir.It would appear that a woman was considered to have married if she took her belongings from her parents house and moved them and herself into the home of a man who was not already married to someone else.There are records of parents using the occasion to transfer property to the bride or the groom but there are no other signs of anything approaching a ceremony or a party.One of the more curious mysteries in that civilization is the complete absence of information on the act of getting married.Legal papyri always identified a woman as the wife of and there are many documents attesting to a couples divorce.Herodotus wrote that no one wants to give their daughters in marriage to a swineherd.