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If your unit is deployed or projected to be deployed for an extended period, consider scheduling periodic visits by local media agencies in order to keep the local populace informed of your activities.In coordination with your supporting PAO representative, coordinate occasional radio and/or television appearances to address issues of concern with the local populace or to allow the local populace to call and express their concerns.- Be sensitive to the local cultural practices when hiring local translators support (e.g., the role of women in a Muslim society), as well as potential risks to minority translators placed within forward operational area (females, regional ethnic minorities, etc.).In coordination with your PAO representative, develop a discreet but effective communications signal to let you know when you should curtail or avoid comments on risky or sensitive questions during interviews.Conduct formal "School of the New Drill Sergeant" instruction during cycle breaks to provide them a solid understanding of unit training policies and authorized methods for conducting soldier training.The qualifications for entry into the service (especially waivers) are fairly complex and technical, and your "off-the-top-of-your-head" reaction to a problem might actually be a recruiting impropriety Cinema Van, Cinema Pod, Educator Tours and Visits, High School Newspaper Editor's Tours, Home Town Recruiter Assistance Program, special public relations events, training assistance visits, and the like.

Although apportionment between companies has negative aspects, the real problems arise with commanders or section leaders who reward or promote everyone, or, equally bad, those who do not reward anyone.

Put all the unit commanders in a special addressee list and provide them with regular (weekly or so) updates on what's going on outside the motor pool and local training areas where they spend most of their time.

It may not be beans, track pads, and bullets, but it can be the financial status of programs and facilities, renovation and construction plans, program adjustments or improvements that you want their support of or comments on, or other garrison/BSB related subjects.

Do not solicit linguists or translators from the local populace for employment until you have consulted with your supported higher headquarters and validated established procedures for employment; e.g., security and background check, health and medical assessment, language proficiency, or other specific requirements.

- Retain three or more translators in the task force headquarters for "as needed" employment by other members of the task force; e.g., by the legal advisor, military police, contracting officer, logistics officer, etc.

Although apportionment between companies has negative aspects, the real problems arise with commanders or section leaders who reward or promote everyone, or, equally bad, those who do not reward anyone.

Put all the unit commanders in a special addressee list and provide them with regular (weekly or so) updates on what's going on outside the motor pool and local training areas where they spend most of their time.

It may not be beans, track pads, and bullets, but it can be the financial status of programs and facilities, renovation and construction plans, program adjustments or improvements that you want their support of or comments on, or other garrison/BSB related subjects.

Do not solicit linguists or translators from the local populace for employment until you have consulted with your supported higher headquarters and validated established procedures for employment; e.g., security and background check, health and medical assessment, language proficiency, or other specific requirements.

- Retain three or more translators in the task force headquarters for "as needed" employment by other members of the task force; e.g., by the legal advisor, military police, contracting officer, logistics officer, etc.

The instrument used to gather this information was a comprehensive survey that asked open-ended questions of former Army battalion commanders, who were students at the United States Army War College Class of 1996.