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As there is no accepted embodiment of a Hoosier, the IU schools are represented through their letters and colors alone. On January 12, 2017, the Federal Government officially changed the nickname of people from the state of Indiana from "Indianans" to "Hoosiers", making Indiana the first state not to have a version of their state name in their nickname ("Illinoisans", "Texans", etc.).In addition to universal acceptance by residents of Indiana, the term is also the official demonym according to the U. In addition to "The Hoosier's Nest", the term also appeared in the Indianapolis Journal's "Carrier's Address" on January 1, 1833.A letter by James Curtis cited by Dunn and others as the earliest known use of the term was actually written in 1846, not 1826.Similarly, the use of the term in an 1859 newspaper item quoting an 1827 diary entry by Sandford Cox was more likely an editorial comment and not from the original diary.The inhabitants of the cabin would then reply "Who's here?

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Johnathan Clark Smith subsequently showed that Nicholson and Dunn's earliest sources within Indiana were mistaken." as a general greeting and warning when hearing someone in the bushes and tall grass, to avoid shooting a relative or friend in error.The poet James Whitcomb Riley facetiously suggested that the fierce brawling that took place in Indiana involved enough biting that the expression "Whose ear? This arose from or inspired the story of two 19th-century French immigrants brawling in a tavern in the foothills of southern Indiana.The story was told to Dunn in 1901 by a man who had heard it from a Hoosier relative while traveling in southern Tennessee. Vance Hartke, who introduced the story into the Congressional Record in 1975, and matches the timing and location of Smith's subsequent research. by Stan Hugill, in reference to its former use to denote cotton-stowers, who would move bales of cotton to and from the holds of ships and force them in tightly by means of jackscrews.Dunn could not find any family of the given name in any directory in the region or anyone else in southern Tennessee who had heard the story and accounted himself dubious. "To hoosier" is sometimes still encountered as a verb meaning "to trick" or "to swindle".

Johnathan Clark Smith subsequently showed that Nicholson and Dunn's earliest sources within Indiana were mistaken.

" as a general greeting and warning when hearing someone in the bushes and tall grass, to avoid shooting a relative or friend in error.

The poet James Whitcomb Riley facetiously suggested that the fierce brawling that took place in Indiana involved enough biting that the expression "Whose ear? This arose from or inspired the story of two 19th-century French immigrants brawling in a tavern in the foothills of southern Indiana.

The story was told to Dunn in 1901 by a man who had heard it from a Hoosier relative while traveling in southern Tennessee. Vance Hartke, who introduced the story into the Congressional Record in 1975, and matches the timing and location of Smith's subsequent research. by Stan Hugill, in reference to its former use to denote cotton-stowers, who would move bales of cotton to and from the holds of ships and force them in tightly by means of jackscrews.

Dunn could not find any family of the given name in any directory in the region or anyone else in southern Tennessee who had heard the story and accounted himself dubious. "To hoosier" is sometimes still encountered as a verb meaning "to trick" or "to swindle".

Dunn traced the word back to the Cumbrian hoozer, meaning anything unusually large, derived from the Old English hoo (as at Sutton Hoo), meaning "high" and "hill".