Atlanta dating single

04-Apr-2020 22:41

Georgia, the state's largest city, and the seat of Fulton County. It is also one of the most important commercial, financial, and transportation centers of the southeastern United States.

census, the population of Atlanta is 420,003, although the metropolitan area (comprising twenty-eight counties and more than 6,000 square miles) has a population of more than 5.2 million.

Located in the northern portion of the state, Atlanta enjoys a high mean elevation—1,050 feet (320m) above sea level—which distinguishes it from most other southern (and eastern) cities and contributes to a more temperate climate than is found in areas farther south.

The three dominant forces affecting Atlanta's history and development have been transportation, race relations, and the "Atlanta spirit." At each stage in the city's development, these three elements have come into play.

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Both of these actions sparked increased settlement and development in the upper Piedmont section of the state and led to Atlanta's founding.

Many existing industries in the city were soon converted to wartime production, and newly established factories provided much-needed Confederate munitions and supplies.

Two years later the city adopted a new name—Atlanta.

Supposedly a feminine version of the word Atlantic, the name was first used by John Edgar Thomson, chief engineer of the Georgia Railroad, to designate his railroad's local depot.

In 1837 engineers for the Western and Atlantic Railroad (a state-sponsored project) staked out a point on a ridge about seven miles east of the Chattahoochee River as the southern end of a rail line they planned to build south from Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The town that emerged around this zero milepost was called Terminus, which literally means "end of the line." Had this remained the town's only rail connection, Atlanta might well have stayed a small, end-of-the-line frontier town.

Many existing industries in the city were soon converted to wartime production, and newly established factories provided much-needed Confederate munitions and supplies.

Two years later the city adopted a new name—Atlanta.

Supposedly a feminine version of the word Atlantic, the name was first used by John Edgar Thomson, chief engineer of the Georgia Railroad, to designate his railroad's local depot.

In 1837 engineers for the Western and Atlantic Railroad (a state-sponsored project) staked out a point on a ridge about seven miles east of the Chattahoochee River as the southern end of a rail line they planned to build south from Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The town that emerged around this zero milepost was called Terminus, which literally means "end of the line." Had this remained the town's only rail connection, Atlanta might well have stayed a small, end-of-the-line frontier town.

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